Author Interview on ‘toofulltowrite’

First and foremost, I wish you all a happy and productive New Year.

Towards the end of the year, I was approached by David Ellis and asked if I would agree to be interviewed for his toofulltowrite website subtitled as a Creative Palace for Artists and Author Resources. David asked some interesting questions that had me scratching my head at times and here is the result.

PORTRAITS 043_cr 300 tallAuthor Interview – Judith Cranswick

Welcome to the latest installment in the Author Interview series and we are finishing out the week with a bang.

Tonight we speak to Award Winning author Judith Cranswick about her crime thriller novels and what makes them so special, engaging and worth reading.

 

Hi there Judith, thank you for taking the time to be with us today to talk about your thrilling stories.

Blood Hits the Wall front cover copyLet’s start with your latest novel “Blood Hits the Wall” – Book 4 in the Fiona Mason Mysteries Series. Please tell us more about Fiona, how she has evolved over the course of four novels and what sleuthing adventures and sticky situations she is going to find herself dealing with this time round?

In the first book in the series, “Blood on the Bulb Fields”, Fiona was recently widowed. She had spent the last nine years looking after her terminally-ill husband. When he died, family and friends suggested she get herself a little job to keep herself occupied though becoming a tour manager for a coach company wasn’t quite what they had in mind. Fiona has grown in confidence as the year (and the first four books) has gone on and in “Blood Hits the Wall”, on her tour to Belin and the Elbe Valley, her relationship with MI6 chief, Peter Montgomery-Jones develops though they continue to find themselves at odds with one another all too often as they pursue their separate objectives. This time she wants his help when the group is detained in Berlin following the murder of their local guide, but he has his own secret mission which he cannot jeopardise. Continue reading

Free Book Promotion

A Death too Far cover iguana copy 300 tallA Death to Far will be available as a free download from all Amazon Kindle stores from 11th-15th December.

How can Kathy uncover the truth about her sister’s death when all she has to go on is a holiday journal and someone is determined to stop her investigation?
Kathy is devastated when Leanne dies on a holiday. It doesn’t help that they argued at the airport. How did Leanne fall from the boat in the middle of the night? Attempting to solve the mystery becomes an obsession that threatens to alienate Kathy from her friends.
Leanne’s journal describes not only her exotic wildlife adventures in a remote Amazon eco-lodge and the fabulous Galapagos Islands but also her suspicions that all is not as it should be. Had she stumbled onto a smuggling racket?

The story centres on Kathy, a woman trying to unravel the truth behind her sister’s tragic death while on holiday in the Galapagos Islands. The author guides us seamlessly through the clues, both in the present and through excerpts from her sister’s journal, and delivers numerous twists, turns, and red-herrings as we follow Kathy’s determined quest for answers.

Available on:

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

and all other Amazon stores

My Favourite Reads of 2016

I hope it’s not too early to wish you all a wonderful Christmas and a happy and fruitful New Year.

It is one of life’s great pleasures to curl up in bed at night and read a good book, so for my December blog, I’ve decided to share with you some of the crime novels that have given me most pleasure this year. It’s always a tricky task to narrow down the field to a select few, even more so when I realised there would be room to mention only three.

I’ve chosen one by a well-known author whose books I’ve been enjoying for almost twenty years, but my other two choices are writers who were new to me this year. It’s always a delight to discover a new author and once I’d read the first books in each of their series, it wasn’t long before I’d downloaded the next.

graveyardThe Graveyard of the Hesperides

Lindsey Davis

Marcus Didius Falco’s feisty adopted daughter, Flavia Albia, is a remarkable woman in what is very much a man’s world. Young, widowed and fiercely independent, she lives alone on the Aventine Hill in Rome and makes a good living as a hired investigator. An outsider in more ways than one, Albia has unique insight into life in ancient Rome, and she puts it to good use going places no man could go, and asking questions no man could ask.

The Graveyard of the Hesperides is the fourth in the Flavia Albia series

I have a long list of writers I admire and think of as my ‘favourite’ authors, but I can probably count on one hand the number of prolific writers –  with lists of 20 to 30 books to their credit – who I can claim to have read every one of their books. Lindsey Davis is one. (If you’re wondering who the others might be, they include Agatha Christie, Dick Francis and Terry Pratchett.)

I loved the first Falco novel and, from the 1990 onwards, have eagerly awaited the publication of each new book. I must admit, at first I was not sure about her new protagonist, Flavia Albia. After 20 Falco novels, I felt a little cheated having a substitute. Falco was such a loveable rogue – always wheeling and dealing. However, though this new series is different, I’m now a firm fan. I confess it was Tiberius Manlius Faustus who won me over, just as he has Flavia Albia as the series has progressed. Nonetheless, as well we know, the course of true love never runs smooth and there are always dead bodies getting in the way!

 

dante-collectionThe Dante Connection (Book 2)

Estelle Ryan

Despite her initial disbelief, Doctor Genevieve Lenard discovers that she is the key that connects stolen works of art, ciphers and sinister threats.

Betrayed by the people who called themselves her friends, Genevieve throws herself into her insurance investigation job with autistic single-mindedness. When hacker Francine appears beaten and bloodied on her doorstep, begging for her help, Genevieve is forced to get past the hurt of her friends’ abandonment and team up with them to find the perpetrators.

Little does she know that it will take her on a journey through not one, but two twisted minds to discover the true target of their mysterious messages. It will take all her personal strength and knowledge as a nonverbal communications expert to overcome fears that could cost not only her life, but the lives of many others.

This is a series with an unconventional protagonist. Genevieve is autistic and she has a band of likable but equally unconventional guardians who work on the other side of the law.

Estelle Ryan is one of my great finds of the year. She ticks every box – great plot, superb characterisation and a page-turning quality that keeps me reading long past my switch-off-the-light-and-go-to-sleep time. I thoroughly enjoyed The Gauguin Connection, book 1 in the series and couldn’t wait to read the next, but the best thing is, I still have seven more yet to read! By the time I’ve caught up, I expect book 10 will be in print. Fantastic.

 

divining-the-lostDivining the Lost: Andromeda, Book 2

G.M. Cameron

DC Frankie McCormack’s ex-wife has gone missing and Frankie’s going mental. The second in the Andromeda series sees DI Mike Donnelly and Annie use their very differing method to help. With Donnelly trying to keep him out of it, he turns to Annie’s jiggery-pokery.

But Annie is being attacked by an old enemy and dodging a violent stalker just at the moment …

A gritty tartan noir with wit and a hint of the occult.

 

With a name like Andromeda, you are not likely to expect a conventional protagonist and the reader certainly doesn’t get one! Though I love all of the many sub-genres that crime has to offer, that’s the attraction, I am always a little wary of delving into the occult. It is however, a testament to my enjoyment that I read the second in the series straight after I’d read the first – Divining Murder.

If you are looking for Christmas presents for family or friends who enjoy crime fiction, you couldn’t go far wrong with these authors, but why not give yourself a treat! You won’t regret it.

I’m sure many of you will have suggestions too. What have been your best reads of 2016?

 

The Life-Gets-in-the-Way Factor

writng-adviceWriting magazines and blogs are full of helpful advice for how to deal with the problems we writers sometimes have to face – dealing with writer’s block, “soggy” middles, constant interruptions and even finding the time to write. I’ve even read articles about finding your best time of day to write – as if most of us could choose when we sit in front of our computer screens or pick up a pen – or the best place to write. One thing I’ve never seen written about, but something I frequently struggle with, is when life gets in the way.

Continue reading

Two Nations Divided by a Common Language

quote-two-nations-divided-by-a-common-language-winston-churchill-78-95-13One of the great advantages of eBook publishing is that even a first time novelist can now access a global market without difficulty. EBooks are just as easy to download in America, Canada and Australia as they are here in Britain. However, this has definite consequences which we writers need to bear in mind. Oscar Wilde, George Bernard Shaw and Winston Churchill have all commented on the confusion that arises in the differences in our use of language on either side of the Atlantic.

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The Novelist and Depression – Dealing with the Downside

DepressionWe fiction writers are sensitive people – we live on our emotions. We create characters and, if we want to make them to be real for our readers, we see the world through their eyes. We put our protagonist through all kinds of misery. One problem after another. If we didn’t there would be no story. The more we experience our character’s pain, the better the writing will be. We train ourselves to feel the grief, the despair, the anguish. Is it any wonder that we fall victim to a certain level of despondency when life hands us a bad deal? Life is never fair. I like to claim that I’m a glass half full person, trying to see the best side and count my many blessings, but there are times when I don’t succeed.

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Writing the Novel – The Final Lap

Blood Hits the WallWriting a novel is a totally engrossing occupation. For the last year, ‘Blood Hits the Wall’ has been my obsession. As we writers know, writing is far more than sitting at the PC and getting the words up on the screen. It becomes something that occupies the greater part of your day. The characters and the scenes constantly play out in your mind even when you are busy doing something else entirely.

Rewriting is a lengthy process. Once the first draft is complete and the numerous rewrites analysing plot, characters and pace have begun,  your head starts spinning as you rework sections in your mind. You reach a point when you’re not sure if that great extra clue or nuance is still in your head or if you have already altered the manuscript itself. Whole scenes get moved around to provide a more logical unfolding of the story line. This means a careful check that it does not result in references to events that haven’t happened yet because you’ve moved them later.

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Research – My Excuse for Becoming a Port Lecturer

Boudicca-in-Scotland-banner_originalResearch becomes second nature to writers. That little voice inside that says never miss out on an opportunity because you never know when the experience will come in useful is a good excuse for taking time out from the actual writing. That’s my excuse for spending the last six months totally immersed in the world of port lecturing – telling cruise passengers about the ports we were about to visit. I’ve been a cruise lecturer for several years. I began running fun writing workshops on board ship and then developed a series of talks about writing and what attracts me about writing crime. Continue reading

Technology and the Writer

When I first became a published writer, all I needed to bother about was to produce a novel that was the best I could make it. Today it seems that we writers need to spend almost as much time promoting ourselves as getting words on the page. And that means being internet savvy.

I confess that I’m technically inept. I know my way around Microsoft Word and I’m quite a dab hand at PowerPoint but beyond that, I’m something of a technophobe. My excuse is that I see no point in having a dog and barking yourself. Not that I’m calling my lovely husband a dog but as an electrical engineer who has spent a lifetime in the semi-conductor industry, I leave anything technical to him and have never bothered to learn myself.

Yesterday proved that such a philosophy can have catastrophic consequences. My lack of basic skills let me down big time. I was all set to give a talk using PowerPoint to a local group but it was a catalogue of disasters.

Problem 1

Worried__lookingTwo weeks ago my husband upgraded my PC and my laptop to Windows 10 and yesterday was the first time I’d used my laptop outside the house. I switched on and entered my password as usual but instead of letting me straight in, a message came up beneath my email address saying I needed to put in my password. I had no idea what my Outlook password was. So I picked up my mobile and phoned home. Continue reading